October 24, 2021

Acqua NYC

Fit And Go Forward

Where are you in Ohio’s distribution line?

Where are you in Ohio’s vaccine distribution line? It’s a plan still being hashed out by the state’s top health officials, but Ohioans are getting a first look at who might be first — and who is near the end of the line. At the front of the line are high-risk individuals like health care providers and nursing home residents. This group will be able to receive the COVID-19 vaccine as part of what Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine calls “Phase 1A” of the state’s vaccination plan. Health care providers and personnel routinely involved with the care of COVID-19 patients.Residents and staff at nursing facilities.Residents and staff at assisted living facilities.Residents and staff at Ohio’s veterans’ homes.Patients and staff at psychiatric hospitals.People with intellectual disabilities and those who live with mental illness who live in group homes and their staff.EMS responders.So who’s next in line? That has not been revealed by the state just yet, but based on federal recommendations, we have a pretty good idea of where you stand.The New York Times created an interactive tool to see where residents in all 50 states will appear in the vaccine line. Users can enter basic information like age, relative health status, location and employment field.The tool then gives a rough approximation of where a user will be in line. An older adult in a nursing home would be near the front. Relatively healthy adults not working in health care could be near the end.HOW MUCH OF THE VACCINE WILL OHIO RECEIVE? Many of the details are still being hashed out as the vaccine receives final federal approval. But the governor detailed a preliminary last week.As of right now, the state will receive its first shipment from Pfizer around Dec. 15. Of that first shipment, 9,750 will go to the state’s hospitals (prepositioned sites), and 88,725 will go to Walgreens and CVS, who will in turn distribute to congregate care settings.On Dec. 22, Ohio anticipates a shipment of 201,000 vaccines from Moderna, the governor said. These will go to 98 hospitals and 108 health departments. Hospitals will vaccinate those dealing with COVID patients. Health departments will vaccinate people like EMS and other essential workers.Also on Dec. 22, the governor said the state expects another shipment from Pfizer. The tentative number of vaccines in this shipment is 123,000. These will go to Walgreen and CVS for vaccination of those in congregate care settings.A few days later, Ohio expects to get another 148,000 vaccines from Pfizer and 89,000 vaccines from Moderna.”We’re in a very dangerous situation, and I think we can all agree that we can’t let our hospitals get to the point where health care is threatened,” the governor said. “The curfew, mask-wearing, retail inspection have helped, but they haven’t helped enough. We’ll have to do more. We don’t have a choice.”DeWine acknowledged that these shipments will not be enough to cover the individuals laid out in the first phase of the vaccination process — but it is a start.The governor said families in Ohio deserve to be guided by the facts about a COVID-19 vaccine.This is good news for health care workers who’ve fought through the dark days of this pandemic, but now a new issue is at hand, trust.A recent pew research center survey shows only 51% of adults in the U.S. indicated they would take a coronavirus vaccine.”If employees want to get back to work, it’s probably going to be a better idea to take the vaccine so that everyone is immunized and safe at work than it is to really resist that,” employment attorney Tod J. Thompson said.Thompson said if an employer expects or requires workers to be vaccinated for continued employment, that’s within their rights.”Employers can terminate employees at will for any reason or no reason at all,” said Thompson.Distrust of a vaccine is even higher among communities of color, which is why the Urban League of Greater Southwestern Ohio is working to educate underserved communities about the vaccine.”We want them to use every tool at their disposal to keep them and their families safe, but we also understand that there is a lot of mistrust and a lot of that has to do with historically how African Americans and other disadvantaged populations have been taken advantage of for medical experiments,” Urban League Chief Operating Officer Cinnamon Pell said.

Where are you in Ohio’s vaccine distribution line? It’s a plan still being hashed out by the state’s top health officials, but Ohioans are getting a first look at who might be first — and who is near the end of the line.

At the front of the line are high-risk individuals like health care providers and nursing home residents.

This group will be able to receive the COVID-19 vaccine as part of what Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine calls “Phase 1A” of the state’s vaccination plan.

  • Health care providers and personnel routinely involved with the care of COVID-19 patients.
  • Residents and staff at nursing facilities.
  • Residents and staff at assisted living facilities.
  • Residents and staff at Ohio’s veterans’ homes.
  • Patients and staff at psychiatric hospitals.
  • People with intellectual disabilities and those who live with mental illness who live in group homes and their staff.
  • EMS responders.

So who’s next in line? That has not been revealed by the state just yet, but based on federal recommendations, we have a pretty good idea of where you stand.

The New York Times created an interactive tool to see where residents in all 50 states will appear in the vaccine line. Users can enter basic information like age, relative health status, location and employment field.

The tool then gives a rough approximation of where a user will be in line. An older adult in a nursing home would be near the front. Relatively healthy adults not working in health care could be near the end.

HOW MUCH OF THE VACCINE WILL OHIO RECEIVE?

Many of the details are still being hashed out as the vaccine receives final federal approval. But the governor detailed a preliminary last week.

As of right now, the state will receive its first shipment from Pfizer around Dec. 15. Of that first shipment, 9,750 will go to the state’s hospitals (prepositioned sites), and 88,725 will go to Walgreens and CVS, who will in turn distribute to congregate care settings.

On Dec. 22, Ohio anticipates a shipment of 201,000 vaccines from Moderna, the governor said. These will go to 98 hospitals and 108 health departments. Hospitals will vaccinate those dealing with COVID patients. Health departments will vaccinate people like EMS and other essential workers.

Also on Dec. 22, the governor said the state expects another shipment from Pfizer. The tentative number of vaccines in this shipment is 123,000. These will go to Walgreen and CVS for vaccination of those in congregate care settings.

A few days later, Ohio expects to get another 148,000 vaccines from Pfizer and 89,000 vaccines from Moderna.

“We’re in a very dangerous situation, and I think we can all agree that we can’t let our hospitals get to the point where health care is threatened,” the governor said. “The curfew, mask-wearing, retail inspection have helped, but they haven’t helped enough. We’ll have to do more. We don’t have a choice.”

DeWine acknowledged that these shipments will not be enough to cover the individuals laid out in the first phase of the vaccination process — but it is a start.

The governor said families in Ohio deserve to be guided by the facts about a COVID-19 vaccine.

This is good news for health care workers who’ve fought through the dark days of this pandemic, but now a new issue is at hand, trust.

A recent pew research center survey shows only 51% of adults in the U.S. indicated they would take a coronavirus vaccine.

“If employees want to get back to work, it’s probably going to be a better idea to take the vaccine so that everyone is immunized and safe at work than it is to really resist that,” employment attorney Tod J. Thompson said.

Thompson said if an employer expects or requires workers to be vaccinated for continued employment, that’s within their rights.

“Employers can terminate employees at will for any reason or no reason at all,” said Thompson.

Distrust of a vaccine is even higher among communities of color, which is why the Urban League of Greater Southwestern Ohio is working to educate underserved communities about the vaccine.

“We want them to use every tool at their disposal to keep them and their families safe, but we also understand that there is a lot of mistrust and a lot of that has to do with historically how African Americans and other disadvantaged populations have been taken advantage of for medical experiments,” Urban League Chief Operating Officer Cinnamon Pell said.

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